2019 Excellence In Design Awards

A day at the pool.

Rose Park Pool Operations Building

CITATION AWARD

Cushing Terrell

Located in Billings, MT, USA

Project Description: 
Operations Facility Building for a public park recreation pool in Billings Montana. 3,861 Square feet of enclosed space. 5,350 Square feet of covered exterior space. On March 31st 2016 an arsonist set fire to the existing locker room (1962) and concessions building next to the outdoor pool at Rose Park in Billings MT. Structural and roofing team members were brought on to examine the remains and provide design guidance to allow Billings Parks and Rec to open the facility for the summer of 2016. The pool and watersides could remain but the building needed replacement. Over the summer of 2016 an RFQ was issued for design services for a replacement facility.

The Confluence House

HONOR AWARD

Cushing Terrell

Located in Whitefish, MT, USA

Project Description: 
At the confluence of two winding rivers near Whitefish, Montana sits a 15-acre field of open, swaying wildflower-filled meadows and tranquil wetlands, surrounded by old growth forest. The design team aspired to create a compact, respectful, quiet home that draws inspiration of both form and function from the serene landscape.

Sweetgrass Commons

New, affordable housing in Missoula, Montana.

MERIT AWARD

MMW Architects

Located in Missoula, MT, USA

Project Description: 
Sweetgrass Commons is a 27 unit affordable apartment building in the core of Missoula. The project occupies the western boundary of the Old Sawmill District, an area of transition. Historically, the Champion Sawmill was the heart of the city and the center of industry. Left in decay since its closing in 1990, it is now being revitalized as a dense, walkable, mixed use neighborhood of three and four-story condominiums and townhouses. Most of the development thus far has been high-end; Sweetgrass Commons is the first subsidized housing and will serve residents below 60% area median income. To the north and west of the project site is an existing neighborhood of small homes, gardens, greenhouses, mobile homes, and storage units. Some of these properties are being redeveloped at higher density as the Old Sawmill District begins to be built-out. Many Missoula amenities – such as the Clark Fork River and trails, the Good Food Store, Ogren Stadium, and McCormick and Silver Park – are nearby. The distinct multi-gabled design of Sweetgrass Commons breaks down the scale of the project and provides an architectural transition from the denser, more urban buildings of the Sawmill District to the existing lower density neighborhood to the south and west. Board and batten was used to clad the apartments, and a panel system was used at the stair tower projections and the southern inset porches. The colors were inspired by the lichen covered granite boulders found in the surrounding mountains. Industrial steel and wood slat detailing pays homage to the site’s heritage as a working mill and provides clear focal points at the entries. Sweetgrass Commons has a mix of studios, one, two, and three bedroom apartments. Since many low income qualified residents also have disabilities, special care was taken in designing the building with Universal Design principles. Ten of the units are fully accessible and the rest are adaptable. Each unit has a simple, open, floor plan and a private balcony providing views and connection to the landscape. Oversized windows and 9′ ceilings fill the rooms with light and make their small footprints feel generous. A photovoltaic canopy in the rear courtyard provides both electricity for the building and a shaded outdoor space for residents to enjoy. The computer lab and library area provide space for residents to meet up, access media and connect to the larger world. Below grade parking was a key strategy to allow green space and other amenities on site while maintaining the residential density that was practical for the project. Sweetgrass Commons meets Enterprise Green Communities standards. These criteria are designed by Enterprise to “improve the health and well-being of low-income people by transforming the quality of affordable housing in America.” The Green Communities checklist included many resident amenities such as non-paved open space and locating the project within one half mile of public transportation. Certification also required that every unit meet the ENERGY STAR requirements, achieving a HERS Index score of less than 85, using 50% regional lumber, and incorporating healthy, low VOC paints and adhesives. Sweetgrass Commons was designed and built for Homeword, an affordable non-profit housing developer based in Missoula. Homeword believes that affordable housing can be a beautiful, sustainable, and strong contributor to the city’s urban design. This project occupies a unique space in Missoula, riding the line between the single family and multifamily typology, past and future, underprivileged and affluent. At the center of these contrasts Sweetgrass Commons forms a new neighborhood landmark and acts as a positive catalyst for development.

Lake Yellowstone Hotel

Same luxurious hotel with a fresh new look.

HONORABLE MENTION

A & E

Located in Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA

Project Description: 
Located along the shore of Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park, Lake Yellowstone Hotel is a nationally significant, early twentieth century, grand resort hotel. Originally built in 1891, it is the oldest operating hotel in the National Park System. Despite its location in a rustic, natural environment, the hotel offers luxury and elegance through its architectural style and opulent, modern amenities. An extensive renovation restored the icon’s Colonial Revival style for the enjoyment of guests seeking luxurious accommodation in one of the most popular and remote national parks in the country.

McDonald Building

Offering a new purpose to a once forgotten building.

CITATION AWARD

A &E

Located in Billings, MT, USA

Project Description: 
The McDonald Building is a mixed-use development located in the heart of downtown Billings, Montana. Originally constructed in 1907 as the first YMCA in Montana, the historic building was renovated to provide a variety of functions, in addition to support the Downtown District’s plan for urban renewal. As a recipient of TIF funding, the McDonald Building coincides with the Downtown Billings Framework Plan, which encourages historical restorations. This project breathed new life into the neighborhood by planting a thriving, local business in a central location, in addition to adding a residential component to stabilize the area with full-time residents. Prior to the renovation, the building sat neglected and dilapidated on a key intersection in Downtown Billings. Design efforts restored more than just the style and function of the building, but also the health and spirit of the neighborhood.

Garden City Harvest Farmstead

HONORABLE MENTION AWARD

Natural Dwelling Design

Located in Missoula, MT, USA

Project Description: 
The Garden City Harvest Farmstead (GCH) entailed helping an existing public agency fulfill an immediate need for office and assembly spaces as well as setting the course for future sustainable growth. For over 20 years Garden City Harvest, a Missoula based 501c3 nonprofit has been providing people of all incomes and walks of life with locally grown produce and education on healthy eating through local farms, CSA programs, community gardens and educational programs. In 2015 GCH started their capital campaign to build a new facility to house the growing team and provide a community facility to help better serve its farming and educational programs. With a mandate to keep the new facility in context with its humble agrarian roots and complementary to the neighborhood the Architects embraced the farmstead aesthetic to help inform and organize the hierarchies within the GCH organization. A barn, farmhouse, corn crib and associated outbuildings were sited on GCH’s established five acre urban farm.

University of the Nations Campus

Campus in Cambodia

MERIT AWARD

100 Fold Studio

Located in Battambang, Cambodia

Project Description: 
The campus of University of the Nations – Battambang, Cambodia (U of N) provides a beacon of hope in a nation overshadowed by genocide and civil war. Beginning in 1975, the Khmer Rouge regime killed over two million Cambodians – targeting artists, professionals, teachers, and religious leaders. Suffering from a lack of leaders and political instability, the culture, economy, and physical infrastructure of Cambodia has stagnated for decades. 85% of the current population is under the age of 30 and 50% is under the age of 15. The U of N is an incubator for a Cambodian-led movement to grow future leaders through vocational training and leadership development. The campus is the second largest educational facility within the second largest city in the nation. The facilities can accommodate 1,000 day students and 300 full-time students. The campus hosts conferences for over 5,000 annual attendees from across the nation and Southeast Asia. The design of the campus reflects the dignity and worth of the Khmer people – as a culture and as individuals. The Cambodian staff directed the design team to building precedents that reflect their vision for a redeemed and modernized Cambodia. The design synthesizes affordable, locally-sourced materials; vernacular and colonial passive- cooling strategies; and motifs from Cambodia’s own modern architecture renaissance (1950-60). Architects lived and worked on-site to collaborate with local contractors to incorporate traditional building practices with new design concepts. The master planning, building design, and material detailing foster opportunities for interaction at institutional, classroom, and individual scales.

The Willson Residences

HONORABLE MENTION AWARD

Comma-Q Archiecture, Inc

Located in Bozeman, MT, USA

Project Description: 
The Willson Residences are an outstanding creative example of adaptive reuse of the original Gallatin County High School building. The team has done a masterful job of respecting the historic relevance of this building, while creating an artful blend of classic and contemporary design elements. Formerly known as Gallatin County High School, this impressive brick building was designed in 1902 by Helena architect C.S. Haire and served students and administrators for 97 years. In its heyday it was surrounded by other grand structures that together created Bozeman’s core along the town’s growing Main Street. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Abandoned for ten years, demolition of this stately brick building was being seriously considered due to the building’s dangerous degree of decay. Adding to the typical challenges faced in historic renovation, this building would also require elaborate and costly structural strengthening to meet current seismic standards for this active region. In 2013, recognizing the urgency of preserving and enhancing this iconic landmark a team of dedicated professionals began the monumental task of selective demolition, structural upgrades and mitigation of hazardous materials. This undertaking revealed striking architectural details that had been hidden and unappreciated for years. Friezes that were original to the building, but had been removed and lost for decades, were rediscovered, restored and artistically displayed in the south entry of the building. Many other historic elements have also been featured as part of the new design which repurposed the structure from its institutional past to sixteen tasteful residential condominiums. Each unit within the Willson Residences is unique and is designed to highlight the character of the historic spaces while capturing the essence of contemporary urban loft living. Complete with underground parking, modern design features include expansive windows, private balconies, alcohol-burning fireplaces, high-end kitchen appliances and cabinetry.

Norm Asbjornson Hall

Various spaces empower students to explore and develop ideas into tangible outcomes.

HONOR AWARD

A & E in collaboration with ZGF Architects

Located in Bozeman, MT, USA

Project Description: 
Located on the Montana State University campus, Norm Asbjornson Hall is an innovative model for cross-disciplinary education. The design sets a new standard for how engineering should be taught, offering students a variety of dynamic spaces for free-flowing discourse and discovery that extend program opportunities across multiple disciplines. The building serves as a conduit for fostering collaboration between unique partnerships (art, music, business, design, and engineering), bringing together a wide range of programs into one innovative facility where synergy occurs by design. Cutting-edge laboratories with progressive technology empower students to explore and develop ideas into tangible outcomes. Multi-purpose spaces simultaneously allow for lecture, team-based learning, hands-on investigation, formal presentation, and musical performances.

18 Peach

Kitchen and dining room with loft above.

MERIT AWARD

Intrinsik Architecture, Inc.

Located in Bozeman, MT, USA

Project Description: 
18 Peach is the next in line for a self-termed ‘hobby developer’ who has singled handedly redeveloped an entire block of East Peach Street in northeast Bozeman. This creative and progressive individual has championed the values of smart growth while challenging the constructs of density and urban living. 18 Peach was created as a result of subdividing a larger underutilized lot. It takes advantage of its unique opportunity by rising above the neighboring rear yards to both capture views and the solar window while offering an important and welcomed infill frontage along the Peach streetscape. With its small and efficient footprint (556 SF) the house is respectful to the existing neighborhood scale, while increasing the density.

The Bozeman Creek Bridge

The Bozeman Creek Bridge at Bogert Park

CITATION AWARD

Intrinsik Architecture, Inc.

Located in Bozeman, MT, USA

Project Description: 
Since the city’s early days, Bozeman Creek has been moved, straightened and channelized, with its banks armored and vegetation removed as it made way for city development. For decades, the creek had been degraded to little more than a ditch with high unstable banks offering poor habitat for native fish and wildlife. Ultimately, the many sections of the watercourse had become a community liability where it should have been an asset. Recently, community groups, city staff, and residents have joined forces to create the Bozeman Creek Enhancement Project, a collaborative effort seeking to improve the health and value of Bozeman Creek in the downtown core. Bogert Park was chosen as a site for revitalization because of its popularity and prominent location, and has since become a flagship demonstration project for the future of Bozeman Creek. The revitalization efforts have brought a new face to the creek with an emphasis on community stewardship and the return of natural ecosystems. The Bozeman Creek Bridge is a primary part of the collaborative improvement efforts at Bogert Park, and provides a moment of pause and contemplation for visitors to become immersed in the natural beauty of the transformed watercourse.

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